"The Evolution of Climate Ideas and Knowledge"

Dublin Core

Description

Begins by examining the "new science of the seveneteenth century" in enlightenment Europe. Heymann shows that the new science of observation, especially scientific weather observation, led to the evolution of climate ideas and knowledge in nineteenth century Europe. The article surveys climate ideas from the early modern and enlightenment period, putting forth a definition of "classic climatology" as developed by Humbolt. After laying this groundword, Heymann, explores the emergence of climatology and climate science in the nineteenth century. This emergence, as Haymann puts it, was a direct result of enlightenment-era weather data collection as well as "the emergence of new approaches and concepts and the enthusiasm created by Humboltian science." Haymann concludes by exploring climate change research and concepts of climate in the second half of the twentieth century.

Publisher

Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change. 1.4 (2010): 581-597.

Date

07/26/2017

Contributor

Language

Type

Collection

Citation

Heymann, Matthais, “"The Evolution of Climate Ideas and Knowledge",” Legacies of the Enlightenment, accessed July 25, 2024, http://enlightenmentlegacies.org/items/show/17.