Browse Items (23 total)

  • Tags: climate

The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins

Tsing traces the rhythms of disturbance-based ecologies through the biological and economic lives of matsutake mushrooms. Attending to the fortuitous multispecies assemblages of lifeforms and lifeways that arise within the ruins of capitalist…

Natural Disasters and the Debate on the Unity or Plurality of Enlightenments,

Discusses eighteenth-century views of natural portents and disasters, mainly in the thought of Edward Gibbon and Adam Smith, and claims, vis-à-vis Jonathan Israel's thesis regarding the Radical Enlightenment, that in fact the Moderate Enlightenment…

Traces on the Rhodian Shore: Nature and Culture in Western Thought from Ancient Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century

Remains, even after half a century, the most comprehensive serious general survey available of the development of intellectual and scientific attitudes toward nature in the history of western civilization from antiquity up to the end of the…

Plant Theory: Biopower and Vegetable Life

Nealon explores the (liminal yet significant) role played by concepts of vegetable life within biopolitical discussions of life in the humanities today. Where Nealon, following Foucault, suggests that modernity has been primarily invested in an…

Re-Thinking Colonialism to Prepare for the Impacts of Rapid Environmental Change

Reo and Parker discuss how landscape change similar to what people are concerned about with climate change today has a long history in certain regions. In what is now called the Eastern U.S., colonialism enacted environmental changes such as massive…

The Melting Ice Cellar: What Native Traditional Knowledge is Teaching Us about Global Warming and Environmental Change

The knowledge systems of Indigenous peoples have historically been rejected by many scientific fields. Climate science is just beginning to catch on to the value of Indigenous knowledge systems. Cochran and Geller discuss the overlaps and differences…

The Right to be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet

Watt-Cloutier gives a biographical account of her work on climate justice in the Arctic region. She discusses her perspective on climate change coming from an Indigenous community perspective. Her notion "the right to be cold" clarifies a different…

"The Climate of History: Four Theses."

This article argues that the thesis of the Anthropocene offers grounds for a reconciliation between human history and natural history, abolishing the Enlightenment ideology of history as the progressive conquest of nature by Man. Drawing on research…

A Temperate Empire: Making Climate Change in Early America

European encountered climates in northern North America that were harsher and more variable than their notions about weather and geography led them to expect. In A Temperate Empire, Anya Zilberstein reveals how colonial conditions generated…

Tambora: The Eruption That Changed the World

A global history of the 1815 Tambora eruption, the climate changes it brought, and their impact on societies, culture, and science. Includes chapters on the experiences of famines in Bengal, Yunnan, and Ireland, and reactions by writers in America…

The Letter from Dublin: Climate Change, Colonialism, and the Royal Society in the Seventeenth Century

This article discusses an anonymous letter published in the Philosophical Transactions in 1676 that reports the theories of American colonists about the cause of their warming climate (cultivation and deforestation), and offers Ireland’s colonial…

Capitalism in the Web of Life: Ecology and the Accumulation of Capital

Written from a Marxist perspective, this book examines the emergence of capitalist modernity in terms of the extraction of natural resources. It analyzes the ways in which the Enlightenment ideology of history as progress depends on reducing "Nature"…

Air Apparent

Air Apparent shows how the weather map has taken on a variety of forms throughout the last four centuries––moving from a hand-eye executed graphic object to a computer-printed and later digitally displayed graphic––by tracing “graphical…

Invisible in the Storm: The Role of Mathematics in Understanding Weather

Readable and informative, Invisible in the Storm is an important companion book for weather and climate scholars because it emphasizes an additional lens through which weather can be studied––the history of math. Invisible in the Storm is a mix…

Ice, Mud, and Blood

Ice, Mud and Blood moves through global climate history, and the accompanying science, more or less chronologically, weaving together diverse climate periods and expert knowledge about them. The first chapter “Greenhouse” is a bird’s eye view…

The Civilizing Process, Nature, and Stadial Theory

Discusses the influence of Enlightenment stadial theory on the ideas of Norbert Elias, particularly as these relate to the utilization of natural resources.

Subjugated Animals: Animals and Anthropocentrism in Early Modern European Culture

Discusses early modern attitudes toward animals with an emphasis on anthropocentrism, and on interdisciplinary sources, including intellectual history, the history of science, literature and art.

Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor

Explores the representational challenges posed by environmental catastrophes that unfold incrementally, in a less spectacular, less visible way than dramatic events. Nixon presents examples of writers doing the conceptual work of making "slow…

History and Nature in the Enlightenment: Praise of the Mastery of Nature in Eighteenth-Century Historical Literature

Outlines how eighteenth-century historians emphasized the use of nature as a precondition for cultural progress. Discusses such things as climatic theories, and stadial theories.