Christian Wolff’s Prolegomena to Empirical and Rational Psychology: Translation and Commentary

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Description

In this translation of a short selection of Wolff’s extremely influential Psychologia empirica (published in 1732, with a second edition released in 1738), he sets out some of his key assumptions regarding how to examine the human mind. The importance of a priori investigations is striking, even in a text literally named ‘empirical psychology’. For Wolff, “Empirical psychology serves to examine and confirm discoveries made a priori concerning the human soul” (232). When Wilhelm Wundt and other 19th-century authors began working to establish psychology as a science, they consciously framed their discipline in opposition to Wolff. (On this, see Richards’ commentary accompanying this translation.)

Publisher

Translated by R. Richards. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 124 no. 3 (1980): 227-239.

Date

08/01/2017

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Citation

Wolff, Christian, “Christian Wolff’s Prolegomena to Empirical and Rational Psychology: Translation and Commentary,” Legacies of the Enlightenment, accessed July 25, 2024, http://enlightenmentlegacies.org/items/show/49.