Gothic Fiction and the Invention of Terrorism: the Politics and Aesthetics of Fear in the Age of the Reign of Terror

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Description

Crawford offers a new take on the rise of the Gothic in the late 18th century. Most interpretations see the gothic as a reaction to the upheavals of the revolutionary era. The new realities created by Revolution, so the argument goes, gave rise to new fears, which the gothic expressed. In contrast, Crawford argues that the Gothic is best understood not as a new set of fears but rather as a new way of talking and writing about very old fears. It is an original study of the aesthetic pleasure that we derive from reading about evil.

Publisher

Crawford, Joseph. Gothic Fiction and the Invention of Modern Terrorism: the Politics and Aesthetics of Fear in the Age of the Reign of Terror. London: Bloomsbury, 2013

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Citation

Crawford, Joseph, “Gothic Fiction and the Invention of Terrorism: the Politics and Aesthetics of Fear in the Age of the Reign of Terror,” Legacies of the Enlightenment, accessed June 25, 2024, https://enlightenmentlegacies.org/items/show/96.